An analysis of the psychological effects of clothing issue

Sometimes a White Coat isnai?? While it has been known for some time that clothing affects how other people perceive us as well as how we think about ourselves, in these recent studies scientists have been exploring the question of whether the clothing you wear affects your psychological processes and how you approach and interact with the world. After numerous experiments, scientists are beginning to conclude that clothes invade the body and brain, putting the wearer into a different psychological state. One of the experiments that was conducted was as follows:

An analysis of the psychological effects of clothing issue

HolmanPennsylvania State University [This paper is drawn, in part, from the author's doctoral dissertation.

Peterson and Mark I. Alpert are thanked for their assistance with the original work. The helpful comments from two anonymous reviewers are also appreciated.

It continues a tradition of research on product meaning but explicitly adopts a communication paradigm.

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The "language" of clothing use in one social system, one situation, and one role was partially decoded and its meaning explained in terms of attributions made to a user.

An early paper by Levy stated that "People buy things not only for what they can do, but for what they mean"p. Robertson elaborated upon Levy by asserting: Products vary in the degree to which social-symbolic meaning is important.

Cars and clothing are both products which are high in visual display and recognized in our society as "saying something" about a personp. As Belk pointed out, and attempted to correct, systematic attempts to study products as means by which individuals communicate with one another have been few in number.

The work presented here is in intellectual sympathy with Belk, although differing somewhat in methodology. Unlike Belk, this research focuses upon one product system, that of clothing, and explicitly studies a single product usage situation for one social system.

An analysis of the psychological effects of clothing issue

The intent of this work is similar to Belk's, namely to initiate a stream of research examining the impact of consumption of visible products upon those observing the consumption, but differs from Belk in that a communication paradigm specifically underlies the research.

The explicit assumptions of this research are that clothing use is communicative; [While many empirical studies have demonstrated the in-formation-value of clothing especially in a first impression situationrelatively few have addressed the issue of how much information is conveyed about an individual relative to other cues facial expression, body type, verbal behavior, etc.

One noteworthy exception is Buckley and Roach For more information on what is involved in communication system decoding see Scheflen The research presented here illustrates this particular approach to product use as an expression of a variety of attributes about the user.

One was that many authors, in writing either about products as indicators of "something" about their users or about products as forms of nonverbal [A very large body of research on nonverbal communication has sprung up during the past twenty-five years.

Relatively little of this, however, deals with products as communication modalities. See Scheflenp. See Holmanp. The other reason that clothing was selected for study is because of a long and very rich literature dealing with clothing's ability to express something about its user.

See Horn and Laver for two excellent examples.Jan 01,  · Psychological and physical effects of being a hostage. For ethical and practical reasons, particularly if children are involved, the follow-up of hostages on release is difficult.

7 Thus, the scientific and clinical database is relatively modest. – These psychological concepts have not been studied very much in the clothing/fashion product domain.

They give new insights into the psychology of clothing opinion leaders and opinion seekers. They give new insights into the psychology of clothing opinion leaders and opinion seekers.

Lefebvre, Verna Mary, "Social and psychological aspects of clothing: independent study vs lecture-discussion " ().Retrospective scores on the social and psychological as­ pects of clothing pretest and posttest for on-campus treatment groups.

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57 Table 5. Mean scores for the 20 selected test items. Slepian and colleagues were interested in studying how formal clothing, much like formal language, can enhance social or psychological distance between people.

For example, people often address an unfamiliar person by title, rather than by first name, even when they have the same social status.

The Psychological Effects of Clothes | Forum on Law Culture & Society

Apr 02,  · Color and psychological functioning: the effect of red on performance attainment. J. Exp. Distinguishing between perceiver and wearer effects in clothing color-associated attributions.

Evol. Psychol.

Psychological effect is one of the most important factors affecting decision making while selecting a brand or a fashion item like clothing or accessories. The consumers develop better association and links with the brands that they are more familiar with (Hoeffler and Keller, ). Purpose – This study sets out to explore the application of psychological research methods (as yet not applied) in the fashion arena. The aim of this project is to quantify, formalise and explore the causal relationships between clothing style, preference, personality factors, emotions and mood with a view to a better understanding of the psychological profile of the fashion timberdesignmag.com Slepian and colleagues were interested in studying how formal clothing, much like formal language, can enhance social or psychological distance between people. For example, people often address an unfamiliar person by title, rather than by first name, even when they have the same social status.

8 – An analysis of background-color effects on the scores of . As in Figs. 2, 3, and 4, clothing fully conceals the bodies, and the female figure lacks feminine characterization altogether, other PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF HIRSUTISM 3 Fig.

5 than m the fonn of a relatively feminine hairdo. The female figure does .

Clothing As Communication: an Empirical Investigation by Rebecca H. Holman